A Cry For Justice

Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence and Abuse in its Midst

Financial Abuse – how to identify and deal with it

Financial abuse is a serious and harmful form of domestic abuse. It is hard to recognize. It can happen to anyone in any relationship. It always involves the use of power and control over another person.

Items from other websites

For Love or Money is  a moving 7 min video in which a survivor tells her story. Some of her story is dramatized (with a man acting the role of her abuser) so you might want a trigger warning. The video comes from Australia and it recommends an Australian website for further support:  http://www.1800RESPECT.org.au

Financial matters when leaving abusive relationships – womenslaw.org

Financial Abuse –  Office on Women’s Health, USA.

What is financial abuse? – Women’s Aid, UK.

Protecting against financial abuse – moneyadviceservice.org.uk

Items from this website

Financial abuse from intimate partners — a lament, stories and tips to protect oneself

Ideas for saving money and reducing your expenses

An account from a survivor whose abuser played stupid in order to obtain financial advantage

Questions to Ask Before Retaining a Lawyer if you are a Victim of Domestic Abuse – this is relevant to financial abuse because if a lawyer who doesn’t represent you well that is more money down the drain.

Scriptures describing Financial Abuse and Covetousness – this is one of the pages under our Scriptures tab in the top menu.

I know there are NO easy answers for those trapped in or suffering the after-effects of financial abuse from an intimate partner. Abusers who are skilled at financial abuse as part of their arsenal of abuse tactics are very canny and cunning. And the institutions of society (like the legal system) that should be protecting victims from these evildoers are woefully failing to protect them. So my heart goes out to anyone who is dealing with heavy-duty financial abuse from their abuser.

I have heard that some banks in Australia have special policies of leniency in regards to domestic abuse victims who are lumbered with the obligation to repay loans their abusive spouses coerced them to be legally responsible for. These Aussie banks still require the loan to be repaid, but they may allow it to be repaid at a slower rate than normal. So it may be worth asking your bank if they have any leniency provisions for victims of domestic abuse – but don’t have high expectations, because from what I’ve heard even the Australian banks that have these policies are not being of much help to victims. And I don’t know whether banks in other countries have any leniency provisions for victims of domestic abuse.

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