A Cry For Justice

Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence and Abuse in its Midst

Christ is Our Righteousness and He Delights in Saving Sinners

1Tim 1:15   The saying is trustworthy and deserving of full acceptance, that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners, of whom I am the foremost.

Christ is our righteousness. I am justified fully and completely before God by faith alone in Christ alone. I am righteous because Christ’s righteousness has been credited to me, and my sins credited to Him and fully paid for at the cross. Justice has been served, and God remains just. This is the good news of the gospel. If anyone is still thinking that it is by their performance that they will be accepted by God, then they are still approaching God by the Law, and the only result of the Law is condemnation, death, and hell. Christ justifies the UN-godly. Christ came into this world to save SINNERS. God’s love is such that it is not a matter of US loving Him first, but of HIM loving us while we were still sinners. If you would be just before God and be forgiven your sins, then you must cease all efforts from trying to make yourself “holy” enough so that God is somehow put into your debt and owes you that forgiveness. It won’t work.

And then we might mention a word here to anyone who might think that they are so miserable of a sinner that God would never forgive and accept them. Hear Christ’s own words, then read those of the Apostle Paul (above) once again:

Mar 2:15-17  And as he reclined at table in his house, many tax collectors and sinners were reclining with Jesus and his disciples, for there were many who followed him. And the scribes of the Pharisees, when they saw that he was eating with sinners and tax collectors, said to his disciples, “Why does he eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  And when Jesus heard it, he said to them, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.”

The hymn-writer Joseph Hart had it exactly right:
Come, ye sinners, poor and needy,
Weak and wounded, sick and sore;
Jesus ready stands to save you,
Full of pity, love and pow’r.
Come, ye thirsty, come, and welcome,
God’s free bounty glorify;
True belief and true repentance,
Every grace that brings you nigh.
Come, ye weary, heavy-laden,
Lost and ruined by the fall;
If you tarry till you’re better,
You will never come at all.
Let not conscience make you linger,
Not of fitness fondly dream;
All the fitness He requires
Is to feel your need of Him.

11 Comments

  1. G. F. Mom

    That is a beautiful hymn! I never heard that one before. I like “Beautiful Scandalous Night” as one of my favorites, which the one shared reminded me of. Thanks for sharing the gospel. I think It’s important to keep this message on our hearts.

  2. D. Anne

    Thank you Pastor Jeff for once again reminding us that our righteousness is in Christ, and not an ounce of it comes from ourselves, our good works, or good behavior. THIS is the message of Christ!

  3. Victorious

    Thank you for this message, Jeff. We are so programmed today that “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is” that it’s difficult to accept Christ’s free gift. I appreciate this reminder that it’s really, really, true that Jesus did indeed pay the debt for our sins.

  4. Joseph Hart certainly knew what he was talking about.

  5. The hymn by Joseph Hart is # 473 in the Trinity Hymnal, if any of you happen to have a copy. 🙂 Correct that: # 472.

  6. Brenda R

    I have never heard that hymn before, it is so true. God needs nothing from us, we need Him completely. We are so in need and floundering that Jesus come to our rescue. Nothing else worked. No matter what God offered, we humans couldn’t follow the rules. Food for thought: We had a discussion about “the fall” tonight in Bible study and determined that it really wasn’t a fall, but a leaping off the cliff. The first couple knew what they were doing no matter the coercion involved. We call what happened in the garden “the fall” which implies an accident occurred, when they actually jumped in with both feet and found the water was really deep and they were drowning.

  7. fiftyandfree

    Amen! Thanks for posting that encouraging message and beautiful hymn!

  8. If you look it up on YouTube there are some very nice renditions, both traditional and contemporary.

  9. Finding Answers

    Quoting from the hymn:
    All the fitness He requires
    Is to feel your need of Him.

    Again, I wrestle with the “head”(academic) and “heart: connection…

    Maybe I’m looking at this the wrong way, or maybe I’m unknowingly caught in a double bind.

    We are told things like forgiveness are a decision, not a feeling.

    Then, in the hymn, feel your need of Him.

    I can feel physical pain, much more so than in times past.

    I can sometimes feel physical pain when I struggle mentally to find words to express myself.

    I can sometimes feel emotional pain if I am walking alongside someone else in support.

    I can always feel spiritual pain when I feel distant from God.

    I cannot connect the dots…and then my heart feels pain. Something is missing….

    • Finding Answers

      Adding on to my own comment……

      I wrote “…..or maybe I’m unknowingly caught in a double bind.”

      ^That (previously unknown) double bind no longer exists.

      The posts title “Christ is Our Righteousness and He Delights in Saving Sinners”

      ^That.

      I wrote “Something is missing….”

      I missed feeling Him.

      • It sounds like you have had a profound breakthrough, Finding Answers. 🙂 🙂 🙂

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