A Cry For Justice

Awakening the Evangelical Church to Domestic Violence and Abuse in its Midst

Abuse Victims Need Christ Too

UPDATE Sept 2021: I have come to believe that Jeff Crippen does not practise what he preaches. He vilely persecuted an abuse victim and spiritually abused many other people in the Tillamook congregation. Go here to read the evidence. Jeff has not gone to the people that he spiritually and emotionally abused. He has not apologised to them, let alone asked for their forgiveness.

***

Romans 3:23-24, for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God, (24) and are justified by his grace as a gift, through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus…

Being a victim of abuse does not make a person right with God.  Most of the abuse victims I have contact with are Christians because they find our abuse sermon series on Sermon Audio, a Christian website.  But not all victims are Christians.  In my years as a police officer, most of them I met were not right with God in Christ.  I remember one woman, about 35 years old, at a domestic disturbance call I received.  She was drunk, crying – just a mess.  She told me as soon as I arrived (and in the presence of her abusive partner) that he was threatening to sodomize her if she didn’t obey him.  It was a typical scenario.  She looked like the source of the problem.  He had it all together, was calm, well-dressed, reasonable.  Of course the reason she was a mess was because of him!

This woman was a victim.  She was oppressed and suffering.  She was not a Christian, but I think that the Lord still takes sides in situations like hers.  He hates abusive people no matter who their target is.

Nevertheless, we must remember that if anyone, including a victim, is going to be put into a right relationship with God, they must hear about and believe in His Son.  They must confess with their mouth Jesus as Lord and believe in their heart God raised Him from the dead (Romans 10:9-10).  In fact, it turns out that Christ is their true Redeemer and Rescuer.  All of us were abused and oppressed by Satan the moment we entered with world, and it is only Christ who destroyed the works of the devil and sets us free (Hebrews 2:14).

So we must not stop short when we help victims.  As we show them the love of Christ in action by helping them get free of abuse, we also need to “preach Jesus” to them.  Often, abuse victims are a fertile mission field.  It has been a sorely neglected mission field, even though “the fields are white for harvest” (John 4).  Imagine telling the history of God’s deliverance of Israel from oppressive slavery and abuse in Egypt.  We can tell them of the Passover Lamb and how Christ is the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world.  Just as they need a temporal exodus from their abuser, so they need an eternal deliverance from sin and Satan.  And I think that in some ways, abuse victims may well understand all of these in ways that perhaps other people cannot.  A woman who has had to stand firm against her tormentor and be courageous for her children is possibly a person who grasps more clearly what confessing Christ in this fallen world will cost.

So when we give victims “bread,” let’s remember to give them the Bread of Life too.

1 Comment

  1. Now Free

    I agree, that we must, to be truly helpful to victims of abuse, tell them of Christ and His saving grace. The victim must confess that Jesus is Lord, that God sent His Son into the world to be a sacrifice for our sins. Only then will they become truly set free, with God directing their paths. But sometimes, it takes a long time. At least it did for me.

    I was a Christian before marrying my husband over 40 years ago. The abuse started shortly after marriage. I kept this abuse a secret. I realize now though that the church I attended apparently wasn’t interested in helping a victim of abuse. It was an issue that was too terrible and personal…too much “trouble” to really delve into. Likely if someone did approach me and want me to confide, I would have opened up. I denied his abuse, pretending it didn’t occur. It seemed that no-one knew at the time. I’ve recently realized that others very likely did know. It seems the scars on my face hadn’t healed quite as completely as I thought they had, even though I spent almost 2 weeks at home at the time. God kept me strong. And then He made me face the truth. I really was abused, and He would see to it that others would know and learn.

    I’ve learned also…it has taken me a long time. It takes God’s people to help others. God uses us in these ways. But God in His wisdom and love has also given us free will. How long will we continue to wait, deny the abuse, pretend that there is nothing wrong, even though we feel that there is trouble? Will we continue our stonewalling, and think perhaps someone else might be better qualified? We need to act, and to act lovingly and without delay!

Leave a comment. It's ok to use a made up name (e.g Anon37). For safety tips read 'New Users Info' (top menu). Tick the box if you want to be notified of new comments.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: